How 3D Printing Helps Manufacturing Operations?
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How 3D Printing Helps Manufacturing Operations?

By Manufacturing Technology Insights | Thursday, November 07, 2019

3D Printing 3D printing localizes production, which cuts down on carbon footprint and shipping costs associated with it. When products are manufactured using plastic powder or dust, the products are also 100% recyclable.

FREMONT, CA: Majority manufacturers want to know what 3D printing technology is good for today. In terms of products that can be manufactured, the list extends to dental molds, eyewear, prosthetics, jewelry, musical instruments, smartphone cases, architectural models, car parts.

Below are some ways in which 3D printing is being used today:

Prototyping:

3D printing is flexible for single-use scenarios. Organizations with engineering and design skills can quickly draw up CAD models for new product ideas and create physical versions of products with a 3D printer. Traditional manufacturing approaches like machining, forging, and casting, can be cost-prohibitive for rapid prototypes. 3D printing helps compel a more iterative approach to innovation–one that makes it easier and cost-effective. The process facilitates organizations to get physical goods into the hands of decision-makers, stakeholders, and focus groups who can then decide whether or not to move forward with further development.

Replacement Parts:

Keeping all possible spare parts in inventory is expensive, and depending on third-party providers to deliver a desirable part can mean long wait times. But if one has a 3D printer and the required CAD drawings available or if one can find them quickly, they can use 3D printing to manufacture the part on-site. For businesses running large vehicle fleets, manufacturing facilities, or warehouses, 3D printing provides a way forward that can help diminish downtime due to equipment maintenance or failure.

Profitable Individualization (Configurable Products):

3D printing symbolizes an intriguing solution for highly configurable products where keeping all probable combinations of parts in stock can be a logistics problem. At a time when businesses seek ways to usefully address the expectations of consumers for individualized products that fit their unique requirements, enterprises can use 3D printing to meet demand by printing out the parts that customers need.

Sustainability:

3D printing localizes production, which cuts down on carbon footprint and shipping costs associated with it. When products are manufactured using plastic powder or dust, the products are also 100% recyclable. So, whatever is formed can be returned to the dust from which it is made, making the base material available once again for use in new goods. For organizations serious about their sustainability efforts, 3D printing can facilitate to put the circular economy into action.

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