Textile: Technology Helps Energy and Water Efficiency, and GHG...

Textile: Technology Helps Energy and Water Efficiency, and GHG Emissions Reduction

By Manufacturing Technology Insights | Monday, April 20, 2020

The potential population and economic growth will kindle a rapid increase in textile production and expenditure. This, in turn, will drive a noteworthy rise in the textile industry’s unconditional energy and water use, and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and other environmentally harmful emissions.

FREMONT, CA: The textile industry utilizes electricity, water, and fuel in abundance with identical Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHGs) and contaminated effluent. Pertaining to energy use, the textile industry’s share of electricity and fuel use within the final energy usage of any country depends on the arrangement of the textile industry in that state. For example, electricity is the leading energy source for yarn spinning, while fuels are the chief energy source for wet textile processing.

Along with using substantial energy, textile manufacturing makes use of plenty of water, mainly for wet processing of materials, and produces a considerable volume of contaminated effluent. Preserving water and mitigating water pollution will be part of the industry’s plan to make its production methods more environmentally friendly, principally in places where water is scant.

The world’s population was 7.4 billion in 2016, and the number is anticipated to grow to 9.5 billion by 2050. The volume of this growth will ensue in underdeveloped and developing countries. With the improvement in the economy of these countries, residents will have more purchasing power, thereby increasing the per-capita consumption of goods, including textiles.

The potential population and economic growth will kindle a rapid increase in textile production and expenditure. This, in turn, will drive a noteworthy rise in the textile industry’s unconditional energy and water use, and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and other environmentally harmful emissions. Reports also document the application of commercialized technologies. However, given the continuing increase in textile production, future reductions in absolute energy use and CO2 emissions will need further innovation in this industry.

Innovations will include the growth of different materials and processes for textile production or tools that can economically confine and store the industry’s CO2 emissions. The growth of these emerging technologies and their deployment will be a crucial factor in the industry’s mid and long-term climate change mitigation plans. Nevertheless, the data is inadequate and scattered concerning advanced or emerging energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies for the sector that has not yet been commercialized.

Some of the emerging energy and water effectiveness, and GHG emissions reduction technologies for the textile business include:

• Ultrasonic treatments.

• Friction spinning.

• Plasma technology.

Inkjet printing.

• Real-time online monitoring systems.

• Firms can use advanced cotton fiber pre-treatment to increase dye receptivity in wet processing.

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